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Phillip Milner

Assistant Professor

Baker Laboratory, Room 328
pjm347@cornell.edu

Educational Background

  • Postdoc, University of California, Berkeley
  • PhD, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
  • BA, Hamilton College

Website(s)

Overview

Prof. Milner is an assistant professor of Chemical & Chemical Biology at Cornell University. His teaching and research interests lie at the intersection of organic, inorganic, and materials chemistry, with a particular emphasis on reaction mechanisms. The primary goals of his research group include designing new materials and strategies for effecting challenging synthetic transformations, as well as applying the strategies of synthetic and physical organic chemistry to the development of new porous materials with a broad range of potential applications.

Keywords

organic synthesis, metal-organic frameworks, electrochemistry, porous materials, physical organic chemistry

Departments/Programs

  • Chemistry and Chemical Biology

Graduate Fields

  • Chemistry and Chemical Biology

Research

One major focus of research in the Milner group is the design of materials to not only enable new synthetic transformations, but also to change the ways in which reactions are carried out. To achieve these goals, we are interested in unlocking the untapped potential of porous materials such as metal-organic frameworks as tools for organic synthesis. In addition, we will employ electrochemistry to effect controlled redox processes that cannot be achieved in any other manner, with an emphasis on understanding and ultimately controlling how chemistry at the electrode surface governs the outcome of reactions. As a second major direction, the group is investigating the application of strategies from physical and synthetic organic chemistry in the design of new porous materials for which synthesis remains a barrier to their application in areas such as chemical separations, gas storage, organic electronics, and catalysis.

Courses